Posts Tagged ‘Eminent Domain’

New Case Summary — UDOT v. Walker Development Partnership

Posted on: February 10th, 2014 by Cortney Taylor

Utah Court of Appeals

2014 UT App 30  (Click for Full Text of Opinion)

February 6, 2014

In a condemnation proceeding which has lingered for over 20 years, the Utah Court of Appeals agreed that the property owner may not amend its original answer to include a new claim that more property was being taken than was identified in the original complaint.

UDOT initiated this action in 1992, condemning property to widen Wasatch Boulevard.  UDOT took immediate occupancy and completed the project several years ago, but the amount of compensation for the property was not resolved.  In 2011, an appraisal raised the issue that the actual width and ownership of Wasatch Boulevard had not been completely established in 1992. Evidently, the road was never officially condemned, but was established by prescriptive use, and the total width of the right-of-way was disputed.

Beginning in 2011, the property owners argued that the original complaint was in error, because UDOT was acquiring more property than was described in the 1992 action. The owners petitioned to amend their answer to include a claim for additional compensation for the property within the roadway (to which they claimed ownership under the prescriptive use statute).   UDOT argued that it was too late to amend the answer.

The Court of Appeals held that the owners could not amend their answer after such a long time. The Utah Rules of Civil Procedure prohibit an amendment that raises a new claim for compensation after a long period.  The Court indicated that the owners may have grounds for a separate action against UDOT, but declined to comment further on that possibility.

New Case Summary — Schroeder Investments, LC v. Edwards & UDOT

Posted on: May 6th, 2013 by Cortney Taylor

Supreme Court of Utah

2013 UT 25 (Click for full text of Opinion)

May 3, 2013

          The Utah Supreme Court considered an application of the “more necessary public use” provision of Utah’s eminent domain statute, and rejected an expanded version of the so-called “compatible use exception” to that provision. 

          Schroeder Investments hoped to develop its property but needed a wider access road.  Schroeder initiated a condemnation action to acquire the needed width, but, before the action was resolved, UDOT purchased the property for a detention pond.  Schroeder continued its condemnation action against UDOT.  UDOT moved to dismiss the condemnation action, under the “more necessary public use” provision, found at 78B-6-504(1)(d) which states that property already appropriated to a public use cannot be taken through eminent domain, unless the proposed use is a “more necessary public use.”

          Schroeder conceded that UDOT’s detention pond was “more necessary” than its proposed private access road, but claimed it qualified for the “compatible use” exception.  Schroeder argued that is was possible to accommodate both the road and the detention pond, if UDOT modified its design.  Schroeder offered to give UDOT a portion of its property for the modified pond, in exchange for the access road.  Schroeder also offered to reimburse UDOT for plan and design modifications.   

          The Supreme Court rejected Schroeder’s argument that the “compatible use” exception applied because the road and the detention pond could coexist, if UDOT accepted Schroeder’s proposal to modify the pond to allow space for the road.  In other words, Schroeder claimed the right to condemn the property because it was willing to compensate UDOT for the road.  The Court explained that the “compatible use” exception applied only when there was property available to use or condemn, and the exception did not become available through a willingness to pay for modifications to the other use. 

          The Court illustrated its holding through two Utah cases from the early 1900s.  In the first, a telegraph company sought to condemn an easement along the edge of a railroad company’s right-of-way.  The Utah Supreme Court held that since the railroad was not using its full right-of-way, the unused portion was available for condemnation.  Furthermore, the telegraph lines could be installed and used without affecting the railroad’s use of the right-of-way. 

          The second case concerned a mining tunnel that had excess capacity.  A different mining company sought to condemn an easement to use the tunnel.  The additional use could be carried out with some minor modifications to the original owner’s use.  The Court in that case held that the excess capacity of the tunnel was available for condemnation. 

          In Schroeder’s case, the Court held that since there was no excess or unused property available, there was no property to condemn, and the “compatible use” exception did not apply.  Schroeder’s willingness to pay to have the pond modified did not qualify for the exception. 

          It is noteworthy that the Court did not determine that UDOT’s retention pond was “more necessary” than Schroeder’s access road, because Schroeder conceded that point.  This case does not preclude the parties from reaching an agreement to modify the pond and allow the access road.  However, Schroeder may not use eminent domain to force UDOT to modify the pond and transfer the road easement.

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2013 Legislative Summary

Posted on: April 3rd, 2013 by Cortney Taylor

2013 Utah Legislature

Summary of Bills That Affect Land Use, Land Development, Property Rights, or Eminent Domain

These summaries are provided for informational purposes only and do not reflect legal conclusions or opinions on any legislation.  Please refer to the bill text, or to the language of the Utah Code.
The text of each bill may be found at www.le.utah.gov, or via the attached links.
All bills are listed under the number assigned during the 2013 General Session.
Substitute bills are indicated in this Summary by an ‘S’ in the bill number.
The Legislature’s enrolled (or final) versions use the original bill numbers only.

List of Bills Reviewed

In Numerical Order

House Bills

H.B. 11-S: Local Transportation Corridor Preservation Fund Amendments

H.B. 29: Adjudication of Water Rights

H.B. 36: Storm Water Capture Amendments

H.B. 54-S2: Property Tax and Appraiser Amendments

H.B. 71: Mobile and Manufactured Home Amendments

H.B. 73: Water Easement Amendments

H.B. 74-S: Property Tax Modifications

H.B. 86: Property Tax Certification Date

H.B. 88-S2: Land Use Amendments (Amends LUDMA)

H.B. 101-S: Homeowners Association Amendments

H.B. 111-S2: Eminent Domain Amendments

H.B. 113: County Governing Body Amendments

H.B. 130-S: Boundary Adjustment Amendments (Amends LUDMA)

H.B. 166: Water Rights Amendments

H.B. 217S2: State Fire Code Act Amendments

H.B. 224: Impact Fees Amendments (Amends LUDMA)

H.B. 236-S: Land Development Revisions (Amends CLUDMA)

H.B. 279: Administrative Hearings By Counties

H.B. 310: Construction Code Amendments

H.B. 326: Division of Water Rights Amendments

H.B. 347: Landowner Liability Amendments

H.B. 348: Local District Amendments

H.B. 358: Instream Flow Amendments

H.B. 360: Water and Irrigation Revisions

H.B. 401-S2: Statute of Limitations on Trespass

Senate Bills

S.B. 30: Water and Irrigation Amendments

S.B. 64-S: Homeowner Reserve Account Amendments  

S.B. 90-S2: Condominium and Community Association Amendments

S.B. 101: Division of Water Rights Revisions

S.B. 153: Local Government Development Amendments (Amends LUDMA)

S.B. 269-S: Property Tax Revisions

Bill Summaries

 The Office of the Property Rights Ombudsman has classified several bills adopted in 2013
based on the impacts on land use, development, or eminent domain.
They are presented here in three categories:

Bills With Significant or Direct Impact

Bills With Moderate or Indirect Impact

Bills With Low or Coincidental Impact 

 

Code Sections Amended or Adopted by the Bills Reviewed in this Analysis

SECTIONS AMENDED

Code

10-9a-103

10-9a-104

10-9a-205

10-9a-305

10-9a-502

10-9a-508

10-9a-510

10-9a-516

10-9a-520

10-9a-604.5

11-36a-102

11-36a-301

11-36a-302

11-36a-703

13-43-203

13-43-205

15A-2-103

15A-2-104

15A-3-102

15A-3-103

15A-3-104

15A-3-105

15A-3-107

15A-3-108

15A-3-110

15A-3-112

15A-3-113

15A-3-202

15A-3-204

15A-3-205

15A-3-206

15A-3-302

15A-3-303

15A-3-304

15A-3-305

15A-3-306

15A-3-307

15A-3-309

15A-3-310

15A-3-311

15A-3-313

15A-3-314

15A-3-401

15A-3-501

15A-3-601

15A-3-801

15A-5-103

15A-5-202

15A-5-203

15A-5-204

15A-5-205

15A-5-206

15A-5-207

15A-5-302

15A-5-401

17-27a-103

17-27a-104

17-27a-205

17-27a-305

17-27a-502

17-27a-505

17-27a-507

17-27a-509

17-27a-515

17-27a-519

17-27a-604.5

17B-1-118

17B-1-119

17B-1-502

23-23-14

41-1a-102

41-1a-503

41-1a-506

41-1a-509

41-1a-510

41-1a-519

41-1a-708

Bill

H.B. 130S; S.B. 153

S.B. 153

H.B. 88S2

H.B. 224

H.B. 88S2

S.B. 153

H.B. 224

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

H.B. 224

H.B. 224

H.B. 224

H.B. 224

H.B. 111S2

H.B. 224

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 310

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 130S, 236S; S.B. 153

S.B. 153

H.B. 88S2

H.B.224

H.B. 88S2

H.B. 236S

S.B. 153

H.B. 224

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

H.B. 224

S.B. 153

H.B. 348

H.B. 347

H.B. 71

H.B. 71

H.B. 71

H.B. 71

H.B. 71

H.B. 71

H.B. 71

 

Code

57-8-3

57-8-7

57-8-7.5

57-8-13.1

57-8-23

57-8-40

57-8-43

57-8-44

57-8-45

57-8a-102

57-8a-105

57-8a-211

57-8a-212

57-8a-301

57-8a-302

57-8a-402

57-8a-403

57-8a-404

57-8a-405

57-8a-406

57-8a-40

57-14-1

57-14-2

57-14-3

57-14-4

57-14-5

57-14-6

57-14-7

59-2-102

59-2-503

59-2-506

59-2-912

59-2-914

59-2-1001

59-2-1004

59-2-1006

59-12-102

61-2g-301

61-2g-406

61-2g-407

70D-2-401

72-2-117.5

73-1-4

73-1-10

73-1-11

73-2-1

73-2-22

73-2-25

73-3-1.5

73-3-10

73-3-12

73-3-16

73-3-18

73-3-20

73-3-30

73-3-31

73-4-1

73-4-3

73-4-4

73-4-5

73-4-9

73-4-11

73-4-22

73-5-13

78B-6-501

78B-6-505

Bill

H.B.101S

S.B. 90S2

S.B. 64S1, 90S2

H.B.101S

S.B. 90S2

S.B.  90S2

S.B.  90S2

H.B. 101S

H.B. 101S

H.B. 101S; S.B. 90S2

H.B. 101S

S.B.  64S, 90S2

S.B.  90S2

H.B. 101S

H.B. 101S

S.B.  90S2

S.B.  90S2

S.B.  90S2

S.B.  90S2

S.B.  90S2

S.B.  90S2

H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 74S

H.B. 74S

H.B. 74S

H.B. 86

S.B. 269S

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 71

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 71

H.B. 11S

H.B. 360; S.B. 30

H.B. 326

H.B. 326

S.B. 30

S.B. 30

H.B. 36

H.B. 36

S.B. 101

S.B. 30

S.B. 30

S.B. 101

S.B. 101

H.B. 358

H.B. 166

H.B. 29

H.B. 29

H.B. 29

H.B. 29

H.B. 29

H.B. 29

H.B. 29

H.B. 166; S.B. 30, 101

H.B. 111S2

H.B. 111S2

             Sections Repealed and Re-enacted                     Sections Renumbered and Amended

NEW SECTIONS ADOPTED

            New Section 10-9a-52310-9a-524

15A-5-202.5

15A-5-205.5

17-27a-522

17-27a-523

17-27a–522*

17-53-228

           Bill H.B. 130SH.B. 130S

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 217S2

H.B. 130S

H.B. 130S

H.B. 236S

H.B. 279

          New Section 57-13a-10457-14-301

57-14-401

59-2-1017

78B-2-314

                 Bill  H.B. 73H.B. 347

H.B. 347

H.B. 54S2

H.B. 401S2

* Two versions of § 17-27a-522 were enacted by two separate bills.  The discrepancies in the two bills will need to be reconciled prior to final publication.

LUDMA SECTIONS AMENDED BY 2013 LEGISLATION

  Section

10-9a-103

10-9a-104

10-9a-205

10-9a-305

10-9a-502

10-9a-508

10-9a-510

10-9a-516

10-9a-520

10-9a-604.5 

 Bill

H.B. 130S; S.B. 153

S.B. 153

H.B. 88S2

H.B. 224

H.B. 88S2

S.B. 153

H.B. 224

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

 Section

17-27a-103

17-27a-104

17-27a-205

17-27a-305

17-27a-502

17-27a-505

17-27a-507

17-27a-509

17-27a-515

17-27a-519

17-27a-604.5

 

 Bill 

H.B. 130S, 236S; S.B. 153

S.B. 153

H.B. 88S2

H.B.224

H.B. 88S2

H.B. 236S1

S.B. 153

H.B. 224

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

                                                 Sections Repealed and Reenacted

NEW LUDMA SECTIONS ENACTED BY 2013 LEGISLATION

Section

10-9a-523

10-9a-524

Bill

H.B. 130S

H.B. 130S

Section

17-27a-522

17-27a-523

17-27a-522*

Bill 

H.B. 130S

H.B. 130S

H.B. 236S

* Two versions of § 17-27a-522 were enacted by two separate bills.  The discrepancies in the two bills will need to be reconciled prior to final publication.

LUDMA SECTIONS REPEALED BY 2013 LEGISLATION

Section

10-9a-517

10-9a-518

10-9a-519

Bill

H.B. 153

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

Section

17-27a-516

17-27a-517

17-27a-518

Bill

S.B. 153

S.B. 153

S.B. 153